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Learn more about Soil Biology and unlock the secrets of Productive Soil Fertility and Plant Health

The Soil Food Web

Regenerative food security will be the future of our existence.
We take waste and turn it into wealth.

What actually lives in the soil?

Since the birth of agriculture, we have tried to understand how to maintain the health of the soil. From the fertile crescent to the dust-bowl, history has shown how civilizations have crumbled through abuse of the soil. It’s only in the last century that we started to look under microscopes, and try to understand what soil is made of, and how it functions.

Soil is more than minerals and nutrients. It is a web of life held together by symbiotic and predatory relationships of microorganisms, plants, and animals. It is a world of bacteria, fungi, protozoa, nematodes, and microarthropods, visible only under a microscope. When Dr. Elaine Ingham started to explain how these relationships create healthy soil, it challenged the entire paradigm of chemical agriculture

As it turns out, soil fertility depends on more than fertilizers and minerals, it relies on the relationships of all the organisms in the soil. Only when all these
organisms are in their proper balances can plants thrive and soil expand.
If you’re damaging your soil organisms with tilling, compaction, herbicides, pesticides, fungicides, and fertilizers…then you’re damaging your soil fertility.

Benefits of Productive Soil Biology

  • Reduced reliance on chemical pesticides, fertilizers, herbicides, and
    fungicides.
  • With a healthy soil ecosystem, your plants are more resilient against
    extreme weather, pests, diseases, and viruses.
  • Better plant quality; increased BRIX, sugar content, protein content.
  • Reduced costs for farmers and growers. Improved yields. More profit
    with less expenses.
  • Soil Biology and Soil Health can be tested and quantified.
  • Improved Ecological health for people, plants and animals. More
    biodiversity, less biocides, more ability to sustain life.
  • You can tailor Biological treatments to support the plant groups you
    want to support.

Taking on Common Soil Problems

In agriculture, there is a plethora of common soil problems that frustrate growers, from the smallest scale to the largest. Why do weeds take over? Why are some crops vulnerable to pests and diseases? How do you solve problems like high salt content and compaction?

Soil is more than minerals and nutrients. It is a web of life held together by symbiotic and predatory relationships of microorganisms, plants, and animals. It is a world of bacteria, fungi, protozoa, nematodes, and microarthropods, visible only under a microscope. When Dr. Elaine Ingham started to explain how these relationships create healthy soil, it challenged the entire paradigm of chemical agriculture

Understanding How Soil Functions

In agriculture, there is a plethora of common soil problems that frustrate growers, from the smallest scale to the largest. Why do weeds take over? Why are some crops vulnerable to pests and diseases? How do you solve problems like high salt content and compaction?

Soil is more than minerals and nutrients. It is a web of life held together by symbiotic and predatory relationships of microorganisms, plants, and animals. It is a world of bacteria, fungi, protozoa, nematodes, and microarthropods, visible only under a microscope. When Dr. Elaine Ingham started to explain how these relationships create healthy soil, it challenged the entire paradigm of chemical agriculture

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